If you only knew what she was up to. . .

kanakaknowledge:

Montgomery Ernest Thomas Kaluhiʻokalani (born March 30’th, 1959 - died November 2’nd, 2013) died from lung cancer. Known mostly as Buttons, he was a Hawaiian surfing legend who lived on the North Shore of Oʻahu and is well known throughout Hawaiʻi for being an amazing surf instructor and a great family man. Rest in Paradise uncle.. Ā HUI HOU!! 

(via so-treu)

I had a nice weekend. #crown #selfierevolution  (at Cobble Hill)

I had a nice weekend. #crown #selfierevolution (at Cobble Hill)

Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virile. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.

—Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth (via tierdropp)

(Source: ynannarising, via myfirstfeaturefilm)

Assailed on the one hand by white patriarchy and on the other hand by sexist black men and racist white women, black women must be ever vigilant in our struggle to challenge and transform the devaluation of black womanhood.

—bell hooks, The Integrity of Black Womanhood (via hagereseb)

(Source: rs620, via myfirstfeaturefilm)

Someone once told me that human beings have three dimensions: how you see yourself, how others see you, and how you want others to see you. The closer the distance between the three dimensions, the more at peace you are and the more stable you become.

Marwa Rakha, The Poison Tree (via perfect)

(Source: psych-facts, via myfirstfeaturefilm)