If you only knew what she was up to. . .

Quiet Life starring Fresh Daily.

Quiet Life starring Fresh Daily.

@suedejury and I mid convo-pose. #worldupblockparty #beathaus #gloriousweekend #regram

@suedejury and I mid convo-pose. #worldupblockparty #beathaus #gloriousweekend #regram

Foxy’s such a love junky.

Foxy’s such a love junky.

soulbrotherv2:

Banished 
Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). 
Banished raises the larger questions — will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them? Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events. 
The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present. [film link]

soulbrotherv2:

Banished 

Banished vividly recounts the forgotten history of racial cleansing in America when thousands of African Americas were driven from their homes and communities by violent racist mobs in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In fear for their lives, black people left these towns and never returned to reclaim their property. The film places these events in the context of present day race relations, by following three concrete cases of towns that remain all-white to this day (Forsyth County, Georgia; Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas). 

Banished raises the larger questions — will the United States ever make meaningful reparations for the human rights abuses suffered, then and now, against its African American citizens? Can reconciliation between the races be possible without them? Banished follows a twisting trail through yellowed newspaper archives registries of deeds, photos from treasured family albums and dimly recalled stories of elders who lived through those traumatic events.

The film features black families determined to go to any length to reconstruct their families past and gain some justice for their ancestors and themselves. It also interviews dedicated, local, newspaper reporters who braved community opposition to research the banishments in-depth and force their readers to confront their towns past and present. [film link]

(via diasporicroots)

blackartdepot:

The old, subjective, stagnant, indolent and wretched life for woman has gone. She has as many resources as men, as many activities beckon her on. As large possibilities swell and inspire her heart. Anna Julia Cooper

“We have a job as Black women to support whatever is right and to bring justice where we’ve had so much injustice.” - Fannie Lou Hamer

"I honestly believe that I am the only woman in the United States who ever traveled throughout the country with a nursing baby to make political speeches." - Ida B. Wells

"If women want any rights more than they’ve got, why don’t they just take them and not be talking about it." - Sojourner Truth

No march, movement or agenda that defines manhood in the narrowest terms and seeks to make women lesser partners in this quest for equality can be considered a positive step.” - Angela Davis

"More women should demand to be involved. It’s our right. This is one area where we can get in on the ground floor and possibly help to direct where space exploration will go in the future." - Mae Jemison

"SISTERS. BLACK PEOPLE WILL NEVER BE FREE UNLESS BLACK WOMEN PARTICIPATE IN EVERY ASPECT OF OUR STRUGGLE, ON EVERY LEVEL OF OUR STRUGGLE." - Assata Shakur

"How did I make my living? I haven’t. I have eked out an existence." - Ella Baker

“I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.”Maya Angelou

"I would fight for my liberty so long as my strength lasted, and if the time came for me to go, the Lord would let them take me." - Harriet Tubman

Those are truly some strong African-American women and it reminds of the art print Leading Ladies!

(Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower, via diasporicroots)

luminoussea:

“My mother boils seawater. It sits all afternoon simmering on the stovetop, almost two gallons in a big soup pot. The windows steam up and the house smells like a storm. In the evening, a crust of salt is all that’s left at the bottom of the pot. My mother scrapes it out with a spoon. We each lick a fingertip and dip them in the salt and it’s softer than you’d think, less like sand and more like snow. We lay our fingertips on our tongues, right in the middle. It tastes like salt but like something else, too—wide, and dark. It tastes like drowning, or like falling asleep on the shore and only waking up when the tide has come up to your feet and you wonder if you’d gone on sleeping, would you have sunk?”

The Alchemy: Salt from Water

(via guerrillamamamedicine)

We’re socialized to “let you down easy.” We’re not socialized to say a clear and direct “no.” We’re socialized to speak in hints and boost egos and let people save face. People who don’t respect the social contract (rapists, predators, assholes, pickup artists) are good at taking advantage of this. “No” is something we have to learn. “No” is something we have to earn. In fact, I’d argue that the ability to just say “no” to something, without further comment, apology, explanation, guilt, or thinking about it is one of the great rites of passage in growing up, and when you start saying it and saying it regularly the world often pushes back. And calls you names

—The art of “no.” (via menstruate)

(Source: queerintersectional, via so-treu)

kyssthis16:

acceber74:

maatkare-hatchepsut:

wocinsolidarity:

howtobeterrell:

jcoleknowsbest:

mckswift:

mr-sali:

blacknewblack:

ttlogan:

we-live-by-every-single-word:

Their silence was worth a million words

The other reason why Steve McQueen is a boss!

he is Tha dude!!

Those other directors were very quiet when it came to casting people of color which matched the demographic of the area they filmed in…

BANG!

He snatched all of their edges and they sat there quiet as church mice.. These men who yield power in this industry were afraid to own their shit..

imageimageimage

the silence of the white directors is so telling of their cowardice to properly represent poc in their movies

I have never seen a group of grown ass men bitch up this fast goddamn

*crickets* from the peanut gallery….

This is why I’m here for him. He just be spillin’ tea like NOBODY’S business. He makes white people uncomfortable and I’m 5eva here for it.

I will never not reblog this video. One of the many reasons why I love me some Steve McQueen.

(Source: awayoutoftheblue, via blackamazon)